Bali Driver Gede| Bali Tour Service

Best Of the Best

5 of 5 starsReviewed April 26, 2014NEW
Gede is a delightful driver, guide and just a great guy who speaks great English ... always quietly thinking of what, where you may like to see or go next. The new, clean and tidy touring vehicle suited all of us very well.
Aside from just taking us from place to place, on one of our day trips, we headed for Candidasa and lunched at the fabulous Le 48 Restaurant. With a breeze blowing … great service, menu, sophisticated food … comfy seating … we wiled away a couple of hours. On returning, Gede went off track from Karangasem taking us to the gorgeous and uncrowded, White Sand Beach (it’s not on most maps) where we relaxed, swam, checked the scenery and sampled simple food with an ice cold Bintang of course.
Gede is truly his own boss – working to support his lovely family (whom we have met) and you’re with someone who cares about you and the reputation of his business. In all respects, we highly recommend Gede and the services he offers.

Visited October 2013
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Saving teh Bali starling

Saving the Bali starling

Theresia Sufa, The Jakarta Post, Gilimanuk, Bali | Environment | Tue, April 22 2014, 12:43 PM

The jalak bali is a beautiful white bird with blue decorative skin around the eyes.

As an endemic species of Bali symbolizing purity and chastity, it is also called the Bali mynah, the Bali starling, Rothschild’s mynah and the Rothschild starling. Scientifically named Leucopsar rothschildi Stresemann, the Balinese call it curik bali or jalak bali.


The bird was first discovered in 1911 by German ornithologist Erwin Stresemann in the northwestern part of Bali.

As monitored by a team of the Association of Bali Mynah Conservationist (APCB) and Ecosystem Control officers at Brumbun Bay Resort, West Bali National Park (TNBB), the birds like to flock together with sri gunting (ashy drongo), because these song birds are more aggressive toward eagles, which are the natural enemies of curik bali.

Curik bali’s presence in the forest attracts attention, with its white feathers making it easy to spot. To avoid detection by eagles, they often perch on branches of pilang (Acacia trees), which have white bark that can camouflage them.

For the protection of curik bali in nature, in 2004 the APCB, whose members comprise executives of zoos in Indonesia, the Forestry Ministry, bird researchers from the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) and members of the Indonesian Wildlife Conservation Forum (Foksi), conducted a survey in the TNBB to ascertain the causes of world agencies’ failure in curik bali conservation.

It turned out that the failure was due to illegal logging and curik bali poaching, while the park itself was under threat and unable to optimally support the threatened species.

“Since 2004, we’ve been trying to encourage the captive breeding of this endangered species by involving local people in conservation activities, which is backed by a Forestry Ministry decree permitting the public, particularly the community around the TNBB, to keep and breed curik bali,” said the head of the APCB, Tony Sumampau, when monitoring the birds in the park in Gilimanuk, Bali.

In 2007, captive breeding activities in the TNBB area spread. The price of a curik bali was initially about Rp 15 million (US$1,310), which later decreased to Rp 6 million. The birds bred under such conditions are not considered ideal due to having been inbred. For better genetic quality, the APCB has sought new stock and collected 96 bird samples tested by LIPI specialists.

LIPI curik bali researcher Noerdjito said the birds could be genetically improved in captive breeding. Fledglings should be selected for cross breeding to obtain the best offspring. However, the birds are generally released without this happening.

“I’ve repeatedly notified the TNBB of the need to select the young curik bali, but the message may not have been properly received due to frequent post transfers, while the birds kept in several zoos in Indonesia should also be cross-bred for their best broods,” explained Noerdjito.

Besides the Ainun Yaqqin Foundation being located some 4 kilometers from the TNBB, 17 curik bali breeders also live in Sumber Kalmpok village, Buleleng regency.

They belong to the Curik Bali Conservationists Group (KPCB) of Manuk Jegeg. Based on a consensus between the breeders and the APCB, 10 percent of the birds bred are released.

However, the breeders are disappointed by the difficulty in securing a license to sell curik bali.

“We breed curik bali the same way we raise our cattle. We appeal for distribution license facilitation to enable us to sell the birds and buy insects and fruit for the young broods. We applied for a license from the Natural Resources Conservation Agency [BKSDA] a year ago but have had no response,” said Gusti, a breeder from Sumber Klampok.
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Bali with an expert

5 of 5 starsReviewed April 12, 2014NEW

We recently arrived in the beautiful Bali via cruise ship. Our time was limited and we didn't exactly know what to to or see whilst there. Gede was wonderful. He was waiting for us at the dock with a cold bottle of water and a friendly smile. We did a relatively short tour consisting of a silver factory and the monkey forrest in Ubud. At Gede's suggestion we also stopped for a beautiful lunch along the way.

We couldn't have been in better hands and we will definitely contact Gede again the next time we visit Bali. If you want your Bali visit informative and memorable we highly recommend you contact Gede ahead of time and let him know what/where you would like to visit. 
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Bali government increases budget to protect culture

Bali government increases
budget to protect culture

Ni Komang Erviani, The Jakarta Post, Denpasar | Archipelago | Mon, April 14 2014, 9:52 AM


Bali Governor Made Mangku Pastika declared Saturday that the provincial administration had continuously increased its budget allocation to support cultural activities and preserve Balinese culture on the island.
“The provincial administration is strongly committed to keeping Balinese customs and culture alive,” Pastika said during the Dharma Santi gathering, which takes place after Nyepi (the Hindu Day of Silence), at the Bali Arts Center, Denpasar, Saturday evening.


Pastika said that many programs had been implemented by the administration prioritizing the empowerment of customary villages.

“Every year, we increase the customary village budget. Next year, we plan to increase the cash assistance from Rp 100 million [US$8,762] to Rp 200 million for each village,” he said.

Bali has strong ties with 1,488 customary villages, which are different entities to administrative villages. An administrative village is a formal government-defined village. Meanwhile a customary village is a unit for the purposes of adat, or customary law, and a community whose unity is based on customs and traditions.

Customary villages are regarded as the most powerful traditional institutions on the island, wielding significant influence over their members due to their important role in organizing religious and customary rituals, both at the family and village levels.

Most Balinese people view their respective customary villages with the utmost respect, and often some fear, and would not dare to oppose the villages’ policies or breach the villages’ customary laws.

For years, the provincial administration has provided cash support for all customary villages across the island. This year, the provincial administration provided Rp 100 million in cash assistance for each customary village, the same amount was provided in 2013. This was a dramatic increase from the Rp 55 million in 2012.

The administration also provides cash assistance to all subak (traditional farming) organizations, in an attempt to support traditions in the agricultural sector, which themselves are an important foundation for Balinese culture. The administration provided Rp 40 million for each subak.

This year, the administration has also provided motorcycles to 1,480 customary village chiefs across Bali. The remaining eight customary village chiefs will receive motorcycles next year.

“I hope the motorcycles will make it easier for the village chiefs to carry out their duties serving the residents in their villages,” Pastika said after handing over the motorcycles during the gathering.

Chairman of the Grand Council of Customary Villages (MUDP), Jero Gede Suwena Putus Upadesha, conveyed his appreciation of the governor’s policy for customary villages and Balinese culture.

“The assistance for customary villages is really helpful for us to manage and maintain the Balinese culture,” he said. MUDP is an umbrella organization of all customary villages across Bali.
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Great Tour,No Comminication Barrier

5 of 5 starsReviewed April 10, 2014NEW
Me and my girlfriend got to know Gede from our friends who has engaged to Gede tour service last year.

We contact Gede 7 months before our trip, and Gede was so well promptly reply to our email, He suggested places we shall visit, but because we were having a short trip so i have give up to some place has recommended by Gede, He sounds no problem to make any request to suits our needs.

Booked Gede with an Airport pick up but our flight was delayed on arrival about 1 hour due to a bad weather condition take off from Kuala Lumpur, Gede has waiting us at the departure hall with a piece of cardboard, big enough of Text to spot my own name although there was a large crowds of tour operator same as Gede holding their piece of paper to welcome their traveller.

We booked 2 days of trip, And Gede was a well speak english, exactly no problem on communication, along the trip Gede has bring to some topic telling us the culture, current affair and economy and also interesting place in Bali.

We have mention to Gede about our plan to have wedding in Bali, he is so kind that to suggest us to contact a wedding planner, and i have tell Gede our next trip on wedding to bali hope he would be able to be a guide driving our friends and family tour around Bali.

Visited April 2014
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Hindu Influence

Hindu influence

Hindu Java began to spread its influence into Bali during the reign of King Airlangga, from 1019 to 1042. At the age of 16, Airlangga had fled into the forests of western Java when his uncle lost the throne. He gradually gained support, won back the kingdom once ruled by his uncle and went on to become one of Java’s greatest kings. Airlangga’s mother had moved to Bali and remarried shortly after his birth, so when he gained the throne there was an immediate link between Java and Bali. At this time, the courtly Javanese language known as Kawi came into use among the royalty of Bali, and the rock-cut memorials seen at Gunung Kawi (Mt Kawi) near Tampaksiring are a clear architectural link between Bali and 11th-century Java.

After Airlangga’s death, Bali retained its semi-independent status until Kertanagara became king of the Singasari dynasty in Java two centuries later. Kertanagara conquered Bali in 1284, but his power lasted only eight years until he was murdered and his kingdom collapsed. With Java in turmoil, Bali regained its autonomy and the Pejeng dyn­asty, centred near modern-day Ubud, rose to great power. In 1343 Gajah Mada, the legendary chief minister of the Majapahit dynasty, defeated the Pejeng king Dalem Bedaulu and brought Bali back under Javanese influence.
Although Gajah Mada brought much of the Indonesian archipelago under Majapahit control, Bali was the furthest extent of its power. Here the ‘capital’ moved to Gelgel, near modern-day Semarapura (once known as Klungkung), around the late 14th century, and for the next two centuries this was the base for the ‘king of Bali’, the Dewa Agung. The Majapahit kingdom collapsed into disputing sultanates. However, the Gelgel dynasty in Bali, under Dalem Batur Enggong, extended its power eastwards to the neighbouring island of Lombok and even crossed the strait to Java.

As the Majapahit kingdom fell apart, many of its intelligentsia moved to Bali, including the priest Nirartha, who is credit­ed with introducing many of the complexities of Balinese religion to the island. Artists, dancers, musicians and actors also fled to Bali at this time, and the island experienced an explosion of cultural activities. The final great exodus to Bali took place in 1478.
READ MORE - Hindu Influence

Bali History

Dutch conquest
In 1710 the capital of the Gelgel kingdom was shifted to nearby Klungkung (now called Semarapura), but local discontent was growing, lesser rulers were breaking away from Gelgel domination and the Dutch began to move in, using the old policy of divide and conquer. In 1846 the Dutch used Balinese salvage claims over shipwrecks as the pretext to land military forces in northern Bali. In 1894 the Dutch chose to support the Sasaks of Lombok in a rebellion against their Balinese rajah. After some bloody battles, the Balinese were defeated in Lombok, and with northern Bali firmly under Dutch control, southern Bali was not likely to retain its independence for long. Once again, salvaging disputes gave the Dutch the excuse they needed to move in. A Chinese ship was wrecked off Sanur in 1904 and ransacked by the Balinese. The Dutch demanded that the rajah of Badung pay 3000 silver dollars in damages – this was refused. In 1906 Dutch warships appeared at Sanur; Dutch forces landed and, despite Balinese opposition, marched the 5km to the outskirts of Denpasar.

On 20 September 1906, the Dutch mounted a naval bombardment of Denpasar and then commenced their final assault. The three rajahs of Badung (southern Bali) realised that they were outnumbered and outgunned, and that defeat was inevit¬able. Surrender and exile, however, was the worst imaginable outcome, so they decided to take the honourable path of a suicidal puputan – a fight to the death.
The Dutch begged the Balinese to surrender rather than make their hopeless stand, but their pleas went unheard and wave after wave of the Balinese nobility marched forward to their deaths. In all, nearly 4000 Bali¬nese died in the puputan. Later, the Dutch marched east towards Tabanan, taking the rajah of Tabanan prisoner, but he committed suicide rather than face the disgrace of exile.
The kingdoms of Karangasem and Gianyar had already capitulated to the Dutch and were allowed to retain some powers, but other kingdoms were defeated and the rulers exiled. Finally, the rajah of Klungkung followed the lead of Badung and once more the Dutch faced a puputan. With this last obstacle disposed of, all of Bali was now under Dutch control and became part of the Dutch East Indies. Dutch rule over Bali was short-lived, however, as Indonesia fell to the Japanese in WWII.

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Uluwatu Temple

This important temple is perched precipitously on the southwestern tip of the peninsula, atop sheer cliffs that drop straight into the ceaseless surf. You enter through an unusual arched gateway flanked by statues of Ganesha. Inside, the walls of coral bricks are covered with intricate carvings of Bali’s mythological menagerie. Only Hindu worshippers can enter the small inner temple that is built onto the jutting tip of land. However, the views of the endless swells of the Indian Ocean from the cliffs are almost spiritual. At sunset, walk around the clifftop to the left (south) of the temple to lose some of the crowd.


Ulu Watu is one of several important temples to the spirits of the sea along the south coast of Bali. In the 11th century the Javanese priest Empu Kuturan first established a temple here. The complex was added to by Nirartha, another Javanese priest who is known for the seafront temples at Tanah Lot, Rambut Siwi and Pura Sakenan. Nirartha retreated to Ulu Watu for his final days when he attained moksa (freedom from earthly desires).


An enchanting and popular Kecak dance is held in the temple grounds at sunset.
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Hindu Influence

Hindu influence
Hindu Java began to spread its influence into Bali during the reign of King Airlangga, from 1019 to 1042. At the age of 16, Airlangga had fled into the forests of western Java when his uncle lost the throne. He gradually gained support, won back the kingdom once ruled by his uncle and went on to become one of Java’s greatest kings. Airlangga’s mother had moved to Bali and remarried shortly after his birth, so when he gained the throne there was an immediate link between Java and Bali. At this time, the courtly Javanese language known as Kawi came into use among the royalty of Bali, and the rock-cut memorials seen at Gunung Kawi (Mt Kawi) near Tampaksiring are a clear architectural link between Bali and 11th-century Java.

After Airlangga’s death, Bali retained its semi-independent status until Kertanagara became king of the Singasari dynasty in Java two centuries later. Kertanagara conquered Bali in 1284, but his power lasted only eight years until he was murdered and his kingdom collapsed. With Java in turmoil, Bali regained its autonomy and the Pejeng dyn­asty, centred near modern-day Ubud, rose to great power. In 1343 Gajah Mada, the legendary chief minister of the Majapahit dynasty, defeated the Pejeng king Dalem Bedaulu and brought Bali back under Javanese influence.
Although Gajah Mada brought much of the Indonesian archipelago under Majapahit control, Bali was the furthest extent of its power. Here the ‘capital’ moved to Gelgel, near modern-day Semarapura (once known as Klungkung), around the late 14th century, and for the next two centuries this was the base for the ‘king of Bali’, the Dewa Agung. The Majapahit kingdom collapsed into disputing sultanates. However, the Gelgel dynasty in Bali, under Dalem Batur Enggong, extended its power eastwards to the neighbouring island of Lombok and even crossed the strait to Java.
As the Majapahit kingdom fell apart, many of its intelligentsia moved to Bali, including the priest Nirartha, who is credit­ed with introducing many of the complexities of Balinese religion to the island. Artists, dancers, musicians and actors also fled to Bali at this time, and the island experienced an explosion of cultural activities. The final great exodus to Bali took place in 1478.

READ MORE - Hindu Influence
 

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